Jason Russell

Jason Russell

Associate
Philadelphia

Email jason.russell@​hoganlovells.com

Phone +1 267 675 4668

Fax +1 267 675 4601

Practice groupLitigation, Arbitration, and Employment

Jay Russell leverages his background to provide high-caliber advice to organizations facing challenging legal issues and regulatory uncertainty.

Jay focuses his practice on clients in the life sciences and health care industries, particularly entities facing civil actions or government investigation. As a former paralegal for our Medical Device Regulatory group, his cross-practice experience interacting with governmental agencies provides invaluable context during these high-stakes matters.

Prior to joining Hogan Lovells, Jay worked as a paralegal for another leading law firm and clerked for the Honorable Lee A. Solomon of the New Jersey Supreme Court. Jay is also passionate about using his skills to the benefit of his community, as demonstrated by his years of work with the Philadelphia Homeless Advocacy Project.

While in law school, Jay served as executive editor of the Rutgers University Law Review.

Awards and recognitions

2015-2016

Best Brief
The Honorable James Hunter III Moot Court Competition

Education and admissions

Education

J.D., Rutgers Law School, cum laude, 2018

B.A., College of the Holy Cross, 1998

Bar admissions and qualifications

Pennsylvania

New Jersey

Court admissions

U.S. District Court, District of New Jersey

U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania

Representative experience

Advised a leading pharmaceutical manufacturer on an internal investigation involving salesperson's alleged off-label marketing activity.

Advised electronic medical records provider on a government investigation into their business relationship with a clinical partner.

Advised the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network pro bono in the sexual assault retrial of Bill Cosby that resulted in conviction.

Drafted a memo on behalf of an individual in support of his argument that discovery should be limited to jurisdictional facts rather than subject him to discovery on the merits.

Loading data