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David S. Victorson

Associate
Washington, D.C.

David S. Victorson

As a member of the firm's pro bono group, David Victorson litigates civil rights cases of national and local significance. He represents criminal defendants in post-conviction proceedings, including capital punishment cases. He drafts amicus briefs in state and federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court. Locally, David helps victims of domestic violence receive protective restraining orders and obtain child custody.

While in law school, David worked with the Harvard Law School Criminal Justice Institute, representing indigent criminal defendants from arraignment through trial. He was also a member of the International Human Rights Clinic and a line editor for the Journal of Law and Technology. He was honored with the award for Best Overall Agreement for his work in the Williston Negotiation and Contracting Competition.

David served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable Chief Judge Solomon Oliver, Jr., of the Northern District of Ohio. Prior to law school, David worked in the creative department of a major Los Angeles feature film studio, where he helped develop stories for production.

Practices

Representative experience

Drafted an amicus brief on behalf of client in a U.S. Supreme Court civil rights and civil liberties case.

Representation of death row inmates in Texas and Arkansas.

Representation of criminal defendant in Massachusetts Appeals Court.*

*Matter handled prior to joining Hogan Lovells.

Education and admissions

Education

  • J.D., Harvard Law School, 2016
  • M.F.A., University of Southern California, 2009
  • B.A., University of Southern California, 2006

Bar admissions and qualifications

  • District of Columbia
  • New York

Court admissions

  • U.S. Court of Appeals, 6th Circuit
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