We use cookies to deliver our online services. Details of the cookies we use and instructions on how to disable them are set out in our Cookies Policy. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. To close this message click close.

Mitchell P. Reich

Senior Associate
Washington, D.C.

Mitchell P. Reich

Mitchell P. Reich focuses on Supreme Court and appellate litigation. He has filed numerous merits and certiorari-stage briefs in the Supreme Court on subjects ranging from personal jurisdiction and international arbitration to education and sovereign immunity. Mitch is adept at cutting through difficult legal issues to find creative solutions and presenting them in a clear and compelling style.

Before joining Hogan Lovells, Mitch clerked for Associate Justice Elena Kagan of the U.S. Supreme Court and Chief Judge Merrick B. Garland of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He also worked in the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel, where he advised the White House, the Attorney General, and federal agencies on major questions of constitutional, statutory, and administrative law.

Mitch graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where he was President of the Harvard Law Review and a member of the winning team in the Ames Moot Court Competition.

"How's this for pressure in your mid-20s: Mitchell Reich... [is] the first openly gay president of the [Harvard Law Review]."

Advocate, Forty Under Forty, 2011

Representative experience

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California (U.S. Supreme Court)

Town of Chester v. Laroe Estates, Inc. (U.S. Supreme Court)

Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District RE-1 (U.S. Supreme Court)

Lewis v. Clarke (U.S. Supreme Court)

Fry v. Napoleon Community Schools (U.S. Supreme Court)

Education and admissions

Education

  • J.D., magna cum laude, Harvard Law School, 2012
  • B.A., magna cum laude, Yale University, 2009

Bar admissions and qualifications

  • District of Columbia
  • New York

Court admissions

  • U.S. Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit
Loading data