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Media Briefing Note: NPPF Publication Imminent

16 March 2012

LONDON, 16 March 2012 - The eagerly awaited publication of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) appears to be imminent and we understand that the NPPF is likely to be published next Wednesday 21 March.  There has been significant debate on the NPPF since the consultation draft was published in July last year.  In particular, we have seen some acrimonious exchanges between the Government and the National Trust regarding the "pro-development" stance in the draft. 

We will be available to comment in detail when the NPPF is published and in particular we will be looking for answers in the final version to the following questions:

  • Will the presumption in favour of sustainable development be retained?
  • Will the Framework contain a definition of "sustainable development"?
  • Will there be transitional arrangements before the presumption applies, in order to give time to local authorities to put in place their core strategies?
  • Will the Government water down the strong growth agenda which appeared in the draft NPPF?

In particular, will the Government water down the principle in the draft NPPF that development should be permitted unless the adverse impacts significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits?

Michael Gallimore, Head of Planning at Hogan Lovells, commented:

"After all of the argument which has taken place regarding the draft NPPF, it is to be hoped that the Government remains committed to an NPPF which reflects a strong growth agenda and which will allow the development industry to move forward with confidence and certainty when promoting development.  A clear and unambiguous Framework is essential to achieve the levels of development and regeneration which are so important to assist in the UK's economic recovery".

 
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