We use cookies to deliver our online services. Details of the cookies we use and instructions on how to disable them are set out in our Cookies Policy. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. To close this message click close.

Hogan Lovells hosts consortium of World War II internment camp representatives

16 May 2016

On 13 May 2016, Hogan Lovells hosted an All Camps Consortium meeting of representatives of all 10 of the World War II internment camps for Japanese-Americans in its new 13th floor meeting space. The all-day event was hosted by the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (HMWF) and the Japanese-American National Museum (JANM), and sponsored in part by the National Park Service through its Japanese-American Confinement Sites (JACS) Program. 

As part of the event, the Embassy of Japan hosted the groups at a reception on Thursday night, including the presentation of an award to National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis for his leadership in efforts to preserve the WWII camps. Former Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta, who was confined at Heart Mountain as a boy, was the Consortium’s keynote speaker and presented the award to Director Jarvis.

The Consortium focused on sharing ideas on how to boost awareness of the internment; its relevance today in view of efforts by some prominent U.S. politicians to single out American Muslims; how to create visibility for the sites; how to build support among state and federal leadership for camp preservation efforts; and how the groups can best work together to preserve and share stories, photographs, documents, and artifacts about the camps, including the Eaton Collection, which was recently saved from a public auction after a huge backlash from Japanese-American groups and purchased by JANM.

Since 1998, Hogan Lovells has worked, pro bono, for JANM and the HMWF in coordination with their efforts to secure national historic landmark or national monument designations for the WWII camps. During this time period, Heart Mountain, Minidoka, Topaz, Poston, Granada/Amache, Bainbridge Island, the Panama Hotel in Seattle, and the Honouliuli Internment and Prisoner of War Camp have been designated as national historic landmarks, and Tule Lake was designated as a national monument, joining Manzanar, Rohwer, and Jerome on the list of camps and internment sites that are protected under federal law by the National Park Service.  

To view photos from the event, please click here.

 
Loading data