We use cookies to deliver our online services. Details of the cookies we use and instructions on how to disable them are set out in our Cookies Policy. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. To close this message click close.

Joseph W. Gross

Washington, D.C.

Joseph W. Gross

Joseph Gross draws on his political background to bring a strategic focus to complex civil litigation.

He concentrates his practice on business torts and contract disputes, especially those involving the automotive and insurance industries, and also advocates for automotive clients with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Joseph has developed a broad knowledge in these areas and prides himself on helping clients solve tough problems efficiently.

While in law school, Joseph paved the way for his litigation practice by accepting externships with the Honorable Reggie B. Walton and the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division. He further honed his legal writing and research skills as Senior Articles Editor of the American University Law Review, where he won the Lura E. Turley prize for best student work published in the journal. Before he attended law school, Joseph worked in lobbying and political campaign consulting.

Representative Experience

Regularly represents automotive manufacturers in litigation with dealers.

Regularly represents major insurance company in complex coverage actions.

Regularly assists original equipment manufacturers in responding to NHTSA investigations.

Assisted pharmaceutical company in high-profile investigation.

Education and admissions


  • J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, American University Washington College of Law, 2013
  • B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 2008


  • Member, Young Lawyers' Section, Maryland State Bar Association, 2013

Bar admissions and qualifications

  • District of Columbia
  • Maryland

Latest thinking and events

Published Works

Help Me Help You: Why Congress's Attempt to Cover Torts Committed by Indian Tribal Contractors with the FTCA Hurts the Government and the Tribes

62 Am. U. L. Rev. 383
View More
Loading data