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Russian Arbitration Law Reform - A Genuine Prospect or Wishful Thinking?

Michael Davison

Michael Davison,

London

Nathan Searle

Nathan Searle,

London

Alexander Scard

24 March 2012
On 23 March 2012 a panel of experts launched a report highlighting ways in which Moscow can enhance its arbitration and ADR credentials. The report's key recommendations include:

  • A strong arbitral institution in Moscow that is capable of handling major international disputes in Moscow, whether that means establishing a new institution or reforming the existing International Commercial Arbitration Court of the Russian Chamber of Commerce ("ICAC"). ICAC's international credibility would be enhanced if there was increased foreign representation in its administrative body and list of arbitrators, and if the ICAC Rules were amended to make them more appropriate for high value, complex disputes
  • A single court of arbitration specialist judges should be created to deal with all international arbitration matters, including enforcing awards in Russia
  • Further amendments to Russia's arbitration laws, particularly in the areas of arbitrability, interim measures and public policy. Too often the Russian courts have displayed a restrictive interpretation of what is arbitrable

The Russian government responded to the report's recommendations on [   ].

Michael Davison

Michael Davison,

London

Nathan Searle

Nathan Searle,

London

Alexander Scard

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