Publications

Publications

Antitrust cartel cases: What companies can expect under a Trump Administration

In this hoganlovells.com interview, partners Megan Dixon and Kathryn Hellings discuss the trends they are seeing related to domestic and international cartel cases and offer a perspective...

Hogan Lovells Publications

DOJ Announces FCPA Enforcement Pilot Program

Earlier this week, DOJ's Fraud Section released a guidance memorandum (the FCPA Enforcement Guidance Memorandum) outlining an FCPA pilot program that allows for fine reductions beyond what...

Published Works

What To Expect In Criminal Antitrust This Year

Changes in leadership and organizational structure plus an influx of new talent should position the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division for a very active 2015. Having emerged...

Published Works

Too Much of a Good Thing?: Is Heavy Reliance on Leniency Eroding Cartel Enforcement in the United States?

Hogan Lovells Publications

Senate Unanimously Passes Bill Adding Whistleblower Protection in U.S. Antitrust Cartel Investigations

On 5 November 2013, the United States Senate unanimously passed a bill aimed at preventing retaliation against whistleblowers who report criminal antitrust violations.

Read More: Senate Unanimously Passes Bill Adding Whistleblower Protection in U.S. Antitrust Cartel Investigations

Published Works

Antitrust Division ends public naming practice

Published Works

How New Carveout Policy Will Impact Cartel Plea Deals

On April 12, 2013, William J. Baer, assistant attorney general in charge of the United States Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division, released a statement announcing that the division...

Hogan Lovells Publications

Antitrust Division ends practice of publicly naming individuals carved out of corporate plea agreement protections

On 12 April 2013, William J. Baer, Assistant Attorney General (AAG) in charge of the United States Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division (the “Division”), released a statement announcing that the Division will change its practice and no longer publicly list the names of individuals excluded (or "carved out") from the protections afforded by corporate plea agreements. In the statement, the Division also announced that in the future it will limit its use of carve-outs to individuals whom the Division suspects may be guilty of a crime. Historically, the Division had also carved out individuals about whom it had not yet made a prosecution decision and those who refused to cooperate with its investigation. The changes announced Friday effectively harmonize the Division’s policy with the United States Attorneys’ Manual, which governs prosecutorial conduct for the DOJ's Criminal Division and the 93 U.S. Attorney’s Offices, and generally requires that prosecutors not publicly identify potential wrongdoers unless and until they are charged.

Read more: Antitrust Division ends practice of publicly naming individuals carved out of corporate plea agreement protections

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