We use cookies to deliver our online services. Details of the cookies we use and instructions on how to disable them are set out in our Cookies Policy. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. To close this message click close.

Hogan Lovells supports new research by the Council of British Chambers of Commerce in Europe

14 September 2017

Press Contact

Pam Christie

Senior Public Relations Manager
+44 20 7296 2132

Hogan Lovells is supporting new research by the Council of British Chambers of Commerce in Europe (COBCOE) that gives new perspectives on Brexit from businesses operating in Continental Europe. The report,

 Brexit – the voices of European business, identifies key areas of common interest and also sets out priorities for a Brexit that secures prosperity for Europe.

The research took place over a year, following the launch of COBCOE’s Brexit Ambition project supported by Hogan Lovells, in response to the UK EU Referendum in June 2016. It included 27 structured roundtable discussions in 18 countries; a survey which identified main concerns; and a poll amongst the participants.

Charles Brasted, Partner at Hogan Lovells, said, “The voices in this report are a unique contribution to the discussion of what kind of post-Brexit Europe is needed and how we should get there. Businesses around Europe and across sectors are clear that Europe needs a strong and connected UK to continue to thrive, because it is central to access to capital, innovation and talent. However, the European business community feels that the importance of the economy is being overlooked by those leading the negotiations."

Mr Brasted added, “European businesses recognise that they have to work with the process that Brexit has begun and that some change will be needed to give effect to it; but they need, as a matter of urgency, a predictable framework within which to continue to operate, plan, grow and compete during that period of change, and beyond. Agreement on a plan for the transitional period should not be delayed any longer, so that businesses have as much time and information as possible to plan and implement contingencies effectively and can avoid making costly adjustments that prove unnecessary in hindsight.”

 

Contacts

 
Loading data